Field introduction:Biomedical Measurements and Diagnostics

Students in the Course of Biomedical Measurements and Diagnostics learn the underlying science for developing new medical measurement and diagnostic techniques, then use these to conduct fundamental medical research as well as education and research on clinical applications. We teach the following fields.

Medical Ultrasound

Research on new methods for ultrasonic measurements and controls for quantitative diagnosis of biological tissues

Professor Hiroshi Kanai Professor
Hiroshi Kanai
Associate Professor Mototaka Arakawa Associate Professor
Mototaka Arakawa

Ultrasonic measurements of physical properties such like viscoelasticity of biological tissues and organs are investigated to realize their quantitative diagnosis, in addition to qualitative diagnosis based on conventional ultrasonic images. Researchers acquiring deep knowledge and excellent ability in engineering and fundamental knowledge in medicine, such like physiology, are nurtured through research and development of methods for controlling ultrasonic fields, ultrasonic measurements, and digital signal processing required for the quantitative measurements.

  1. Studies on high-performance digital signal processing and ultrasonic measurements and their application for medicine and biology
  2. Studies on control of ultrasound field for high temporal and spatial resolution medical imaging
  3. Studies on tissue characterization and quantitative measurements of the dynamics and function of biological tissue
Laboratory site
Imaging of propagation of spontaneous vibration in the heart wall

Imaging of propagation of spontaneous vibration in the heart wall

Top: Microscopic image of normal (left) and aggregated (right) red blood cells (RBCs). Bottom: Change in the sizes of ultrasonic scatterers (RBCs) due to aggregation during avascularization

Top: Microscopic image of normal (left) and aggregated (right) red blood cells (RBCs).
Bottom: Change in the sizes of ultrasonic scatterers (RBCs) due to aggregation during avascularization

Biomedical Imaging

Imaging of biological tissues by novel data acquisition and analysis

Professor Yoshifumi Saijo Professor
Yoshifumi Saijo

Our laboratory is developing signal and image processing methods of ultrasound, CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in order to realize three-dimensional imaging, precise automatic diagnosis and flow analysis of cardiovascular tissues. We are also developing several acoustic microscopes to visualize kidney, liver, tendon, cartilage, bone and tooth besides cardiovascular tissues and assessing pathophysiology from the view point of biomechanics.

  1. Three-dimensional / automatic precise diagnosis of cardiovascular tissues
  2. Blood flow analysis of cardiovascular system
  3. Development of acoustic microscopes for precise biomedical imaging
Laboratory site
Upper left: Blood flow vector in left ventricle, Upper right: Three-dimensional ultrasound image of fingerprint, Lower left: Ultrasound microscope image of coronary artery, Lower right: Ultrasound microscope image of living cell

Upper left: Blood flow vector in left ventricle
Upper right: Three-dimensional ultrasound image of fingerprint
Lower left: Ultrasound microscope image of coronary artery
Lower right: Ultrasound microscope image of living cell

Biomedical Optics

Applications of biomedical optics for least invasive surgeries and diagnosis

Professor Yuji Matsuura Professor
Yuji Matsuura

Optical applications for bioengineering are developed for least invasive surgeries and diagnosis. We are working on investigation of optical characteristics of biotissues and biomaterials. We also develop optical systems for surgeries and diagnosis in medical and dental fields. The systems include equipments for laser surgery and optical biopsy systems using an endoscope and optical devices.

  1. Remote spectroscopy and spectral imaging systems for medical diagnosis.
  2. Laser delivery systems using specialty optical fibers for laser surgeries.
  3. Optical fibers and waveguides for X ray, ultraviolet light, and terahertz wave.
Laboratory site
Hollow optical fiber bundle for remote Raman spectral imaging

Hollow optical fiber bundle for remote Raman spectral imaging

Thermal imaging during laser ablation

Thermal imaging during laser ablation

Biosensing

Development of Bio-Electronic Interface

Professor Tatsuo Yoshinobu Professor
Tatsuo Yoshinobu

Sensing technologies are essential for the bio-electronic interface. For rapid and reliable analysis of biomolecules, highly sensitive and selective sensors are required for detection, measurement and visualization of specific molecules and ions. In this laboratory, chemical and biosensing technologies are developed based on semiconductor devices, which would be applied to biology and medicine.

  1. Development of chemical imaging sensor.
  2. Biomedical application of sensor technology.
Laboratory site
Chemical imaging sensor system

Chemical imaging sensor system

Visualization of pH by the chemical imaging sensor

Visualization of pH by the chemical imaging sensor

Biomedical Supramolecular Analysis

Comprehensive analysis for biological suplamolecular complexes

Associate Professor Kazutaka Murayama Associate Professor
Kazutaka Murayama

As gene products, proteins are concerned with many biological phenomena and they are key molecules to understand the mechanisms for diseases. A protein structure has close relationship with its function; therefore, revealing protein structures is very important for understanding protein functions. Although analyses of structural details for multidomain proteins or complexes are not simple task to achieve, the combination of various measurements (x-ray crystallography, molecular spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, etc) enables us to investigate mechanisms of diseases as well as to design new drugs.

  1. High resolution x-ray crystallography for biological macromolecules
  2. Structural analyses of multidomain proteins in solution
  3. Development of new approach for structural characterization of proteins
Laboratory site
Measurement of reflection data by x-ray diffractometer

Measurement of reflection data by x-ray diffractometer

Electron density and modeling of protein molecule

Electron density and modeling of protein molecule

Radiation Informatics for Medical Imaging

Applied information technology for medical imaging with radiation

Professor Hiroshi Watabe Professor
Hiroshi Watabe

Radiation is widely utilized for medical field as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Radiation gives us information of living organism noninvasively. However, detected signals are in a tangle from several sources. We will investigate and develop advanced techniques to extract useful information from medical imaging including PET (positron emission tomography), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and other modalities.

  1. Measurement of tracer kinetics in vivo by PET or SPECT to investigate physiology and pharmacology in living organism. and drug e cacy
  2. Multimodal molecular imaging for drug development
  3. Image database for data mining
Laboratory site
General mathematical model for analyzing PET data

General mathematical model for analyzing PET data

Generated parametric images from PET images with a rat

Generated parametric images from PET images with a rat