Field introduction:Biomedical Engineering for Diagnosis and Treatment

Students in the Course of Biomedical Engineering for Diagnosis and Treatment learn the underlying science for developing new medical treatments, then use this knowledge in fundamental medical research as well as in education and research on clinical applications. We teach the following fields.

Ultrasound Enhanced Nanomedicine

Noninvasive ultrasonic treatment of non-superficial tissue

Professor Shin-ichiro Umemura Professor
Shin-ichiro Umemura
Associate Professor Shin Yoshizawa Associate Professor
Shin Yoshizawa

Ultrasound, whose information has been widely used for medical diagnosis, is now becoming to be used for therapy by focusing its energy into a tumor. Not only the technology to focus ultrasonic energy into non-superficial tissue to be treated but also the imaging technologies to aim the tissue and to detect its change due to treatment in real time are required. Furthermore, a tissue selective ultrasonic sensitizer, which induces therapeutic effect at lower ultrasonic intensity, can markedly improve the safety and efficiency of the ultrasonic treatment.

  1. Research and development of ultrasonic focusing technology.
  2. Research on sensitization of tissue to ultrasound.
  3. Research on ultrasonic detection of changes in tissue.
Laboratory site
Tissue heating enhancement with microbubbles

Tissue heating enhancement with microbubbles

Students during experiments

Students during experiments

Quantum Medical Engineering

Quantum medical engineering for brain function diagnosis, cancer diagnosis and cancer therapy

Professor Atsuki Terakawa Professor
Atsuki Terakawa

The three major diseases of aged persons, namely, cancer, heart disease, and the dementia syndrome pose serious problems in an aging society. In this situation, the creation of a comprehensive state-of-the-art future-oriented medical engineering is urgently needed to preserve and improve health in the aging society. Advanced technologies based on radiation and ion beam technology can provide medical devices for diagnosis and treatment at the molecular level. Against this background, we are researching and developing the following technologies.

  1. Development of Positron Emission Tomography (PET)
  2. Development of particle therapy
Laboratory site
Development of PET

Development of PET

Biomedical Engineering for Cancer

Preclinical study of early diagnostic and treatment of lymph node metastasis

Professor Tetsuya Kodama Professor
Tetsuya Kodama

Most cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, and they become disseminated to distant anatomical sites by invasive-metastasis cascade. We will develop diagnosis and treatment methods of lymph node metastasis at the early stages. Our research is interdisciplinary or integrated research based on fluid dynamics, optics, molecular cell biology, oncology, and pathology. Our research subjects are as follows.

  1. Mechanisms of lymph node mediated hematogenous metastasis
  2. Lymphatic Drug Delivery System (LDDS) targeted at metastatic lymph nodes using nanoparticles
  3. Assessment of treatment for lymph node metastasis using noninvasive multimodal in vivo imaging techniques such as high-frequency ultrasound, bioluminescence, micro X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  4. Mechanisms of activation of tumor cells in distant organs after dissection of lymph nodes
Laboratory site
Development of early diagnostic and treatment for lymph node metastasis requires an animal model applicable to clinical trial. We have succeeded in developing the first lymph node metastasis model in which tumour cells introduced into the lymphatic circulation by direct injection into the inguinal lymph nodes induce metastasis in the axillary lymph nodes. (A) lymph node metastasis, (B) metastasis site, (C) angiogenesis captured by high-frequency ultrasound and nanobubbles

Development of early diagnostic and treatment for lymph node metastasis requires an animal model applicable to clinical trial. We have succeeded in developing the first lymph node metastasis model in which tumour cells introduced into the lymphatic circulation by direct injection into the inguinal lymph nodes induce metastasis in the axillary lymph nodes. (A) lymph node metastasis, (B) metastasis site, (C) angiogenesis captured by high-frequency ultrasound and nanobubbles

Biomedical Material Engineering

Development of biomedical materials for cancer treatment and bone repair

Associate Professor Masakazu Kawashita Associate Professor
Masakazu Kawashita

Development of biomedical materials improving quality-of-life of patients is much-expected in our super aging society. We conduct researches on biomedical materials for intra-arterial therapy of deep-seated cancer and bone repair. We synthesize novel biomedical materials by using various techniques and investigate their chemical and physical properties as well as biocompatibility. Also, we attempt to clarify bone bonding mechanisms of artificial materials by engineered and cell biological approaches.

  1. Research on biomedical materials for intra-arterial therapy of deep-seated cancer
  2. Research on biomedical materials for bone repair
  3. Research on bone bonding mechanism of artificial materials
Laboratory site
Intra-arterial therapy of deep-seated tumor by radioactive or magnetic microspheres

Intra-arterial therapy of deep-seated tumor by radioactive or magnetic microspheres

Bioactive titanium with visible-light antibacterial activity

Bioactive titanium with visible-light antibacterial activity

Advanced Dental Science and Technology

Innovation of highly advanced medical technology using high technology in bio-dental engineering

Associate Professor Hiroyasu Kanetaka Associate Professor
Hiroyasu Kanetaka

The aim of our researches is to contribute to the creation of highly advanced medical technology using high technology in bio-dental engineering. In our research, we will develop wireless motion capture system for human body and create reformative functional biomaterials using Ni-free Ti-based shape memory alloys or biodegradable materials. We aim to clinical applications of these new technologies though multifaceted assessments for clinical usefulness.

  1. Development of wireless motion capture system for human body.
  2. Medical applications of Ni-free Ti-based shape memory alloys.
  3. Development of biodegradable biomaterials for medical use.
Development of deglutition evaluation system using magnetic wireless motion capture system.

Development of deglutition evaluation system using magnetic wireless motion capture system.

New internalized orthopedic device for craniofacial plastic surgery using Ni-free Ti-based shape memory alloy.

New internalized orthopedic device for craniofacial plastic surgery using Ni-free Ti-based shape memory alloy.

Biomedical Materials Processing

Development of biofunctionalization process using metallic and ceramic biomaterials

Professor Takayuki Narushima Professor
Takayuki Narushima

Improvements of biofunctionalized reconstruction systems are expected in our country, which has entered the period of a “super-aging society.” Our objective is to make enhancements to hard-tissue substitution systems such as artificial hip joints and dental implants. We focus on metallic biomaterials such as titanium and Co-Cr-Mo alloys and ceramics such as calcium phosphate. We conduct a fundamental study on the process of manufacturing these materials and the control of surface and interfacial reactions under in vitro conditions on the basis of the physical chemistry. Furthermore, we carry out an application study on the development of surface modification processes and suitable materials for use in the fabrication of artificial hip joints showing improved biocompatibility with bones.

  1. Microstructural control of metallic biomaterials with focus on light elements
  2. Fabrication of biocompatible surfaces using ceramic biomaterials
  3. Control of precipitation in metallic biomaterials
Laboratory site
Cross section of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) coating film fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering (a) before and (b) after 1 week implantation.

Cross section of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) coating film fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering (a) before and (b) after 1 week implantation.

Relationship between ISQ and removal torque of ACP-coated and uncoated implants from the femur, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after implantation.

Relationship between ISQ and removal torque of ACP-coated and uncoated implants from the femur, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after implantation.

Biofunctional Materials Processing

Development of biofunctional materials process for regenerative medicine and drug delivery systems

Professor Masaya Yamamoto Professor
Masaya Yamamoto

Biofunctional materials process by understanding biofunctions at a biomolecular environmental level plays a pivotal role in designing biofunctional materials for advanced medicine such as regenerative medicine and drug delivery systems. Our objective is to molecularly understand biofunctions to develop novel biofunctional materials as well as to pursue fundamental researches on organic-inorganic hybrids and soft matters being applicable for biological systems. Moreover, we also design biofunctional materials such as polymeric vesicles and hydrogels on the basis of the fundamental findings and study on their applications for regenerative medicine and drug delivery systems.

  1. Biofunctional materials for the lineage specification of stem cells in regenerative medicine
  2. In vitro disease models for drug discovery research
  3. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles for drug delivery systems
  4. Spectroscopic analyses for understanding tissue functions
Laboratory site

Development of biofunctional materials process for regenerative medicine and drug delivery systems