Field introduction:Biomechanical Engineering

Students in the Course of Biomechanical Engineering for Biomechani-cal Systems learn how to employ a mechanical systems engineering approach to research on life systems, and to apply this approach to fundamental medical research as well as education and research on clinical applications. We teach the following fields.

Bio-Medical Interface Fabrication

Fabrication of biocompatible/bio-functional interface using new machining processes

Professor Tsunemoto Kuriyagawa Professor
Tsunemoto Kuriyagawa
Professor Masayoshi Mizutani Associate Professor
Masayoshi Mizutani

Our laboratory aims to promote innovations of nano-precision Micro/Meso Mechanical Manufacturing (M4 process) at the frontier of manufacturing technology for a smart functional interface. The geometric structure and chemical composition of material surfaces change in a variety of ways under machining conditions. Our laboratory examine this phenomenon and attempt to clarify and control the mechanism. This method can create various surface functions, such as biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, and wettability, which could lead to new surface creation processes. Our goal is to create new principle and technology for the next-future bio-medical interface and devices.

  1. New dental treatment utilizing powder jet deposition of hydroxyapatite,
  2. Generation of biocompatible surface,
  3. Fabrication of biomimetic surface, etc,
Laboratory site
New dental treatment utilizing powder jet deposition of hydroxyapatite

New dental treatment utilizing powder jet deposition of hydroxyapatite

Generation of bio-active surface

Generation of bio-active surface

An example of surface function: surface wettability control

An example of surface function: surface wettability control

Bological Flow Studies

Biomechanics for studying physiological and pathological phenomena of human

Professor Takuji Ishikawa Professor
Takuji Ishikawa
Associate Professor Kenji Kikuchi Associate Professor
Kenji Kikuchi
Associate Professor Keiko Numayama Associate Professor
Keiko Numayama

Biomechanics is a research field to understand biological, physiological and pathological phenomena in terms of physical principles. The methodology gives novel knowledge, which has not been accessible by conventional biological, medical and chemical tools. Our group focuses on biological flow related to human being and microorganisms, and try to overcome some of health and environmental problems. Our research interests cover a broad range of topics, such as large scale GPU computing of a suspension of biological cells, physiological and pathological flow in the cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive systems, and development of a micro-fluidic device for diagnosis.

Laboratory site
Computational biomechanics of cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive systems

Computational biomechanics of cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive systems

Microfluidics for cancer diagnosis and blood flow measurement

Microfluidics for cancer diagnosis and blood flow measurement

Nanodevice Engineering

Next-generation medicine based on micro/nano technology

Professor Yoichi Haga Professor
Yoichi Haga

We develop next-generation medical tools which is not only be thin and small but also be capable of performing several functions using microfabrication techniques such as a technology dealing with building mechanical structures on silicon wafers that is MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology, integrated circuit (IC) technology,and micromachining. Endoscopic or catheter shaped micromachines for use in the human body to perform diagnostics and therapy, and medical devices for use on the surface of skin to perform diagnostics, and healthcare have been developed. New microfabrication and assembly technologies required for development of the devices have also been developed.

  1. Ultra-miniature fiber-optic pressure sensor (O.D. 125μm)
  2. Bending transformative endoscope which enables sophisticated endoscopic surgery
  3. Intraluminal MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) probe
  4. Patch system on the skin for continuous monitoring of biological substances
Laboratory site
Ultra-miniature fiber-optic pressure sensor (O.D. 125µm)

Ultra-miniature fiber-optic pressure sensor (O.D. 125µm)

Bending Transformative Endoscope for Intraperitoneal surgery (O.D. 5mm)

Bending Transformative Endoscope for Intraperitoneal surgery (O.D. 5mm)

Metal needle with micro flow channel for biological substances monitoring patch Cross-section view of flow channel (needle O.D. 200µm).

Metal needle with micro flow channel for biological substances monitoring patch Cross-section view of flow channel (needle O.D. 200µm).

Medical Nanosystem Engineering

Research and development of biomedical micro/nano system based on semiconductor neural engineering

Professor Tetsu Tanaka Professor
Tetsu Tanaka

Semiconductor neural engineering is a discipline that uses semiconductor process/device/circuit technologies to further understand properties of neural systems and to create novel fusion systems of living body and machine. One of the goals in this laboratory is to establish semiconductor neural engineering and develop biomedical micro/nano systems. Another goal is to educate the next generation of leaders in biomedical engineering through research including:

  1. Intelligent Si neural probe and brain-machine interface
  2. Fully-implantable retinal prosthesis system
  3. Bio/nano technology and novel Bio-FET sensor
  4. 3-dimensional integration technology and analog/digital LSI design
Laboratory site
Electrical stimulation and recording of hippocampal slice with intelligent Si neural probe

Electrical stimulation and recording of hippocampal slice with intelligent Si neural probe

A 37x37 pixels artificial retina chip (3.2mm x 3.2mm)

A 37x37 pixels artificial retina chip (3.2mm x 3.2mm)

Device fabrication in the clean room (Handling of 8-inch silicon wafer)

Device fabrication in the clean room (Handling of 8-inch silicon wafer)

Biomedical Nanoscience

Nano-imaging analysis of life and diseases

Associate Professor Makoto Kanzaki Associate Professor
Makoto Kanzaki

We are experiencing an explosive increase in the number of people diagnosed with the various lifestyle diseases including type 2 diabetes worldwide. Current research in the Kanzaki laboratory has been focused on understanding the molecular pathogenesis of the lifestyle diseases (and mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise) by using cutting-edge nano-imaging technology and advanced cellular/molecular engineering technologies.

  1. Nano-imaging analysis of Cellular Functions and Diseases
  2. Cellular Engineering Innovation
  3. Sorting Disorders and Lifestyle Diseases
  4. Mechanisms underlying the Beneficial Effects of Exercise
Laboratory site
Nano-imaging of Qdot-labeled GLUT4 molecules in cell (Molecular Biology of the Cell 21:2721-31, 2010)

Nano-imaging of Qdot-labeled GLUT4 molecules in cell (Molecular Biology of the Cell 21:2721-31, 2010)

Sorting Disorder and Insulin Resistance (Journal of Biological Chemistry 285:34371-81, 2010)

Sorting Disorder and Insulin Resistance (Journal of Biological Chemistry 285:34371-81, 2010)

Wet Device Engineering

Research and development of bio-hybrid devices

Professor Matsuhiko Nishizawa Professor
Matsuhiko Nishizawa
Associate Professor Hirokazu Kaji Associate Professor
Hirokazu Kaji

We have developed biohybrid devices and systems that are bio- and eco-compatible. By inventing manufacturing techniques applicable for delicate biological elements (proteins, hydrogels, cells etc.), superior biofunctions including high-sensitivity and high-efficiency can be utilized as the device functions for medical, healthcare, cosmetic, drug discovery applications.

  1. Biobattery-driven skin patches for healthcare and drug delivery
  2. Hydrogel-based microelectrodes for neuro-monitoring
  3. Implantable autonomous DDS devices
  4. Novel in vitro cellular assay devices
Laboratory site
Self-powered DDS patch

Self-powered DDS patch

Hydrogel-based microelectrodes